References

Thermal Energy Storage

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Being able to decouple power and heat production is increasingly relevant in markets where intermittent renewable energy sources, in particular photovoltaic and wind energy, provide a significant share to the electricity mix. Thermal energy storage (TES) systems can provide this.

Maximizing Flexibility

Special Feature

Integrated storage and boiler design

Largest parameters
max
600
MW
/
580
°C
/
100
BAR
Smallest parameters
min
5
MW
/
70
°C
/
1
BAR

Working Fluids

  • water
  • steam
  • thermal oil
  • molten salt
  • concrete
  • zeolite
  • particles

The benefit of TES systems is their ability to operate the power plant or boiler system under optimal conditions. For example, a combined cycle can be used to maximise heat supply in times when electricity prices are low. District heating plants can shut down one of two boilers and avoid less efficient part-load operation. In addition, biomass and waste-to-energy plants can do away with the need for oil-fired auxiliary boilers during periods when heat demand exceeds the maximum boiler capacity.

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Related References
Germany, Berlin
BMWi
Research & Development
Thermal Energy Storage
R & D
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